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Permezel C H  Capt

Page history last edited by Lenore Frost 4 years, 12 months ago

Volunteers of Essendon and Flemington, 1914-1918

 

From the Scotch College commemorative website.

 

 

Permezel C H  Capt      Cedric Holroyd      7 Inf Bn    ..   Clerk   Single    C of E        

Address:    Moonee Ponds, Byron St, 4 [1914 Electoral roll]   

Next of Kin:    Permezel, E A H, father, 350 Little Collins St, Melbourne    

Enlisted:    11 Nov 1914       

Embarked:     A32 Themistocles 22 Dec 1914

Prior service CMF   58th Inf Regt.         

 

Relatives on Active Service:

Permezel, Eric brother

Permezel, Glynne Tasman brother       

 

Date of death: 14/07/1915

LONE PINE MEMORIAL

 

Captain Cedric Holroyd Permezel as Adjutant of the 58th Inf Bn, CMF.

Australian War Memorial Collection

http://cas.awm.gov.au/item/P08256.001

 

 

 

Captain Permezel performs one of his duties in advising the members of the

Essendon Rifles of the correct dress for the presentation of the King's and

Regimental Colours.   Essendon Gazette 13 Aug 1914.

 

 

Captain Cedric Holroyd Permezel

 

Rod Martin

 

 

Cedric Permezel was extremely keen to do his duty in 1914.  He volunteered for the military forces within fifteen minutes of the news of the outbreak of war reaching Australia.  The twenty-two year-old then applied for an officer’s commission in the AIF on 14 August 1914.  He had been a member of 58 Infantry (militia) Regiment (The Essendon Rifles) for more than three years before the war, rising to the rank of captain, and he was awarded the same rank in the AIF’s 7 Battalion – commanded by his former civilian CO, Lieutenant-Colonel Harold ‘Pompey’ Elliott.

 

Along with the rest of the Battalion, Cedric trained at Broadmeadows between August and October of that year, all of them expecting initially to be sent to the war in Europe as soon as they were ready.  That day duly came on 18 October when A20 HMAT Hororata departed from Port Melbourne.  It would appear, however, that Cedric remained behind and then transferred to the first reinforcements of 7 Battalion early in November.  He may have stayed behind to train those new recruits – one of whom was his younger brother, Eric – or he may have specifically asked to be with the first reinforcements as he knew that his brother was joining up. Whatever the case, he sailed with those reinforcements on A32 HMAT Themistocles on 22 December, joining the initial party in Egypt the next month.  Their target was to be Gallipoli, not the Western Front as most had assumed.

 

While the rest of 7 Battalion trained in the sands of Egypt and misbehaved in the back streets of Cairo, Cedric was assigned as second in command to accompany a party of 900 British-born Imperial Reservists as they returned to Britain to be assigned.  When he returned to Egypt, he was attached to headquarters for a while, and was involved in organizing reinforcements as they arrived from Australia.  We are unsure if Cedric was involved in the initial attack at Gallipoli on 25 April.  He may have remained in Egypt with other reinforcements, rather than sailing with those for 7 Battalion. ‘Pompey’s’ troop lost eighteen officers in the initial attack and approximately 400 other men. Reinforcements were needed desperately.  Once they arrived on the beach, however, they may have had some difficulty in finding 7 Battalion.

 

Supply base, Anzac Cove, 26 April 1915.  Australian War Memorial Collection G00915

 

 

Its target on landing was supposed to be Hill 971, a vital spot of high land on the main ridge of the peninsula, whence moves further east towards the Dardanelles Straits could be planned and carried out.  However, the Anzac forces were put ashore in the wrong place.  Instead of finding an open plain in front of them, they met very different country, described by Ross McMullin as rugged ridges and ravines covered by obstructive, waist-high undergrowth.  While under constant fire, the soldiers had to scramble for cover and attempt to make their way up those ridges and ravines towards the first line of Turkish trenches.  Casualties were very high and the men were scattered over a large area.  Their commander, ‘Pompey’ Elliott, then struggled to establish what he called a rendezvous and gather the men together.  It took several days before the survivors were able to regroup.  By 30 April, Elliott’s command had lost more men than any other battalion.

 

Whatever day he had left for Gallipoli, Cedric had certainly arrived by the start of May and joined his compatriots.  Despite the large losses of men, Cedric and the remainder of the battalion were sent south as part of 2 Brigade to Cape Helles on 5 May to assist the British in their attempts to capture the village of Krythia. As a result of several incompetently planned and executed attacks, the brigade lost one-third of its men.  No significant territory was captured.

 

The further depleted battalion returned to Anzac Cove (as it was now called) on 17 May and resumed its defence of the beach-head. In early July, the men relieved 8 Battalion in the front-line trenches up on the ridges and moved into a new position at Steele’s Post, above Monash Valley, on 8 July.

 

Steele’s Post, showing dugouts on the lower slope.

Australian War Memorial Collection A00745

 

 

Steele’s Post overlooked an important enemy machine gun nest, known as German Officers’ Trench.  It was only fifty metres away and could sweep a large section of the ridge with devastating fire.  The Anzacs had been attempting to tunnel into the ridge and mine the trench, with some success.  By the time 7 Battalion arrived, two mines had been successfully exploded – but the nest was still there.  The Turks were concerned that the Anzacs would capture it, and began a countering bombardment of the post just as Elliott’s men moved into position.  They also did some of their own tunnelling to counteract the Allied efforts and, on 8 July, they broke into the Australian tunnels.  McMullin tells us that Elliott quickly sent in a party led by Cedric and another officer to drive the Turks out.  After they departed, he became concerned that he had sent the men into an unknown situation (neither they nor he had ever been in the tunnels) that could be disastrous.  He rushed into them himself with just two men in tow.  At that time he did not know that Cedric’s group was yet to enter the area.  He and the two men came under fire from the Turks, and the two soldiers ran back, convinced that Elliott had been killed.  Now on his own, Elliott was moving forward carefully when he heard a noise behind him.  He thought it might be Cedric’s party, so he whispered, “Is that you, Permezel?”  There was no answer – because Cedric and his fellow-officer, having been informed by the retreating soldiers that Elliott was dead, suspected a Turkish trap.  Cedric was actually leading a small party with the purpose of recovering the lieutenant-colonel’s body.  Eventually Cedric asked the whisperer to identify himself by a nickname.  This Elliott was able to do (‘Bob Elliott’) as he and Cedric knew each other well from their days together in the Essendon Rifles.  Once reunited, they moved forwards again, and Cedric organized a chain of men to pass sandbags into the tunnel to build a barricade.  Cedric urged ‘Pompey’ to let him put up the barrier, but Elliott refused and quickly constructed it himself.

 

Steele’s Post, May 1915, showing dugouts on the seaward side. 

Turkish snipers occupied the opposite ridge. 

Australian War Memorial Collection G 00942

 

Three days later, 7 Battalion was ordered to participate in a feint to keep Turkish troops in the area while a major attack took place at Cape Helles.  The men were to initiate a bomb assault at a spot called Dyer’s Crater.  This led to a Turkish counter-attack and long-range shellfire, which then persisted for several days.  Elliott wrote to his wife that the battalion’s trenches were “hell upon earth  . . . [with] men  . . . blown to pieces by shell or crushed to death by the masses of earth blown down upon them  . . . “  Then he went on to say:

 

"Poor Capt Permezel had his leg frightfully shattered.  It is said he must lose it".

 

In a later letter to the mayor of Essendon, and with the benefit of hindsight, Elliott elaborated:

 

"Captain Permezel, although he had his leg carried off by a six-inch howitzer shell, and was dying, calmly took out his notebook and sent me as report asking that another officer be sent to take his place".

 

Removed from the line of battle, Cedric was quickly evacuated to the beach and transported to the hospital ship HMHS Gascon, lying about five kilometres off Gaba Tepe. There he died at around 2.30 am on 14 July.

 

Captain Cedric Permezel’s body was buried at sea.  As he has no known grave on the Gallipoli Peninsula, his name is recorded with other Anzacs on the Lone Pine Memorial.

 

 

Lone Pine War Memorial.  (Commonwealth War Graves Commission.) 

Sources

 

Australian War Memorial

Carlyon, Les: Gallipoli, Sydney, Macmillan, 2001

Cochrane, Peter: Australians at war, Sydney, ABC Books, 2001

Essendon Gazette 19 August 1915

McMullin, Ross: Pompey Elliott, Melbourne, Scribe, 2008

Moorehead, Alan: Gallipoli, London, NEL Mentor, 1974

National Archives

Pedersen, Peter: The Anzacs: Gallipoli to the Western Front, Melbourne, Penguin, 2007

 

Mentioned in Correspondence

Extract from letter of Colonel H E 'Pompey' Elliott:

 

"You will have heard of Lieutenant Ken Walker and Captain Permezel.  Both died very bravely during the defence of Steele's Post in July.  Captain Permezel, although he had his leg carried off by a six-inch howitzer shell, and was dying, calmly took out his notebook and sent me a report asking that another officer be sent to take his place".

Essendon Gazette, no date, courtesy of Marilyn Kenny.

 

For empire: Australia's rally to the dear old flag.  Roll of honour:  Victoria's

first expeditionary force to the Motherland.  Osboldstone & Co, Melbourne, 1914.

 

 

Essendon Gazette 19 August 1915

 

Captain Cedric Holroyd Permezel, 7th Battalion, lst A.I.F._ who died on 14th July from wounds received in action in the Dardanelles, was eldest son of Mr. E. A. Holroyd Permezel, solicitor in the city. He was educated at the Scotch College, Melbourne, passing the junior public examination in 1909. From school he entered the staff of  Dalgety and Co. Ltd. He received his provisional commission as second Lieutenant in 1909 in the old 5th Regiment, his appointment being confirmed in March, 1911; became first lieutenant in June, 1912, and captain in August 1913. He was appointed adjutant to the 58th Battalion (Essendon Rifles) nine months prior to the outbreak of war, and was in that position   when war broke out. He volunteered for service abroad within in quarter of an hour of the announcement of the outbreak of war, and was appointed to the 7th Battalion, under Lieutenant-Colonel H. E. Elliott. He was specially detailed as temporary second in command of 900 Imperial reservists  and went to England in command of a quota of these men. On his return to Egypt he was  temporarily attached to the headquarters staff, and left Egypt for the Dardanelles on 1st May, in command of 1500 of the first reinforcements for various battalions. Reaching the Dardanelles on 9th May,  he rejoined his old battalion, the 7th, being placed in command of A Company, consisting of the former A and E Companies. He took part in several big engagements, including the famous charge at Cape Helles on 9th May. He was 23 years of age. One of his brothers, Lieutenant E. C. de Trembley Permezel, has been in the fighting line since 25th April, in the 5th Battalion, under Lieutenant-Colonel D. S.  Wanliss.

 

[At the Civil Service Rowing Club Annual Meeting]:

 

Referring to the fact that the majority of the active members of the club had enlisted, the report said: "Their loss is keenly felt by the club; but when such great issues are at stake we can find nothing but praise for their patriotic action. The large enthusiastic response of our club, even in a sport which has given so largely to the army, is matter for great satisfaction." The report mention ed that several of the members had been ; wounded at Gallipoli, and Staff-Sergeant W. G. Monks, Captain R. T. Watts, and Captain C. H. Permezel were killed in action.

 

BOATING. (1915, September 4). Weekly Times (Vic. : 1914 - 1918), p. 20. Retrieved January 21, 2014, from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article132705225

 

 

 

War Service Commemorated

“Send off to the Essendon Boys”

Essendon Town Hall L-R

St Pauls Anglican Church, Ascot Vale*                                                

Essendon Gazette Roll of Honour DOW            

Patriotic Concert, Essendon Town Hall, 1914  

Scotch College

Melbourne Cricket Club Roll of Honour 1914-1918

58th Infantry Football Club (Essendon Rifles)

 

 

Captain C Permezel

For empire: Australia's rally to the dear old flag.

 

In Memoriam

 

PERMEZEL-In loving memory of my dearly loved  

nephew, Captain Cedric H. Permezel, 7th Bat-

talion, who died at sea of wounds received at

Gallipoli. July 14, 1915, aged 23 years.  

His brave young life nobly given.

(Inserted by his loving auntie, O. Permezel.)

 

PERMEZEL -ln loving memory of Captain Cedric

Holroyd Permezel (7th Battalion, 1st A.I.F.), who

died 14th July, 1914 [sic], of wounds received in

action at Steel's Post, Gallipoli.

The Argus 14 July 1916

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1625456

 

PERMEZEL.-In loving memory of Captain Cedric

Permezel, who died of wounds at Gallipoli on the

14th July, 1915.

For King and country.

-(Inserted by his affectionate uncle, aunt, and cousins

at Yarrawonga.)

 

PERMEZEL -In loving memory of Captain Cedric

Holroyd Permezel (7th Batalion, 1st A.I.F.), who

died 14th July, 1915, of wounds received in

action at Steel's Post, Gallipoli.

The Argus 14 July 1917

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1635682

 

PERMEZEL -In loving memory of Captain Cedric

Holroyd Permezel (7th Batalion, 1st A.I.F.), who

died 14th July, 1915, of wounds received in

action at Steel's Post, Gallipoli.

The Argus 14 Jul 1918

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1406805

 

PERMEZEL. In loving memory of Captain Cedric

Holroyd Permezel, 7th Batt., A.I.F., who gave his

life for King and country at Gallipoli on 14th July,

1915, French national day.

He did not die in vain.

(Inserted by his uncle, A. G. Permezel, Yarra-

wonga.)

 

PERMEZEL-In loving memory of my beloved

nephew, Captain Cedric H Permezel, 7th Bat-

talion, 1st A.I.F., who died at sea of wounds re-

ceived at Steele's Post, Gallipoli, on the 14th

July, 1915, aged 23 years.       

A brave life willingly given for his country.  

(Inserted by his loving auntie.)

 

PERMEZEL In proud and loving memory of Capt- 

tain Cedric Holroyd Permezel, 7th Batt 1st   

A.l.F,. who died on the 14th July, 1915, of

wounds received in action at Steele's Post, Gallipoli.

Pro patria.

The Argus, 14 Jul 1919

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4716387

 

PERMEZEL-In loving memory of my beloved

nephew, Captain Cedric H Permezel, 7th Bat-

talion, 1st A.I.F., who died at sea of wounds re-

ceived at Steele's Post, Gallipoli, on the 14th

July, 1915, aged 23 years.       

A brave life willingly given for his country.  

(Inserted by his loving auntie.)

 

PERMEZEL. In loving memory of Captain Cedric

Holroyd Permezel, 7th Batt., A.I.F., who gave his

life for King and country at Gallipoli on 14th July,

1915

(Inserted by his uncle, A. G. Permezel, Yarra-

wonga.)

 

PERMEZEL In proud and loving memory of Capt- 

tain Cedric Holroyd Permezel, 7th Batt 1st   

A.l.F. who died on the 14th July, 1915, of

wounds received in action at Steele's Post, Gallipoli.

The Argus 14 July 1920

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4596188

 

PERMEZEL.-In loving memory of my beloved

nephew, Cedric, Captain, 7th Battalion, 1st A.I.F.,

who gave his life for his country at Gallipoli on

the 14th July, 1915, aged 23 years

-(Inserted by his loving auntie, O. Permezel)

 

PERMEZEL.-In loving memory of Captain C.

Holroyd Permezel. 7th Battalion, died of

wounds received in action, Steel's Post,

Gallipoli, 14th July, 1915.

The Argus 14 July 1921

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4693264

 

Similar entries to  1921 in 1922 and 1923.

 

 

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